Category: Literature

bart plantenga: Beauty Is As Beauty Does

Literature
Written by

bart plantengaWinter brings frigid nights but this steamy short story from The Man Who Thought He Was The Man Who Loved Women by bart plantenga will heat up your groins!

An ex-girl-friend-stripper-artist once told me that being beautiful – as painful as she found it to admit – was just as bad as being ugly, an Achilles heel, a burden that people hate you for. She may have called it “beauty persecution” or something like that.

Well, Emke saw it differently. Emke considered her considerable beauty to be like a lead guitar, the bumper on a ’62 Cadillac, a backlit Ingres in the Louvres, a spring-loaded firearm… Her beauty, simply put, made others nauseous. It had a destabilizing effect in crowds. Imagine Marilyn Monroe stepping off the Whirl-i-gig into Madison Square Garden during a cock fight. Everyone suddenly gets up off their haunches, standing erect as if saluting the flag, silent and humble for a few endless seconds as their cocks scurry about. Some people will never understand this almost vengefully ecstatic, life-fucking aspect of beauty.

Continue reading

Eva Schweitzer: Berlinica

Conversations, Literature
Written by

Eva C. Schweitzer1Eva  Schweitzer, is a seasoned journalist, author and founder of the Berlin based publishing company Berlinica Publishingwhich introduces English-language books about Berlin to Americans. Bi-continental and always on the move, we had to belt along to catch up with Eva in NYC before she boards her next flight back to Berlin.

S2S: Your career as a journalist started in Berlin, writing for the taz and the Tagesspiegel before you moved to New York nearly 15 years ago. What made you decide to live in the Big Mango?

Continue reading

Kim Yaged’s Passion for Art & Activism

Conversations, Literature
Written by

KimYagedArtist and activist Kim Yaged is a writer with a unique vision, and a passion for art and social justice. She has a creative flair, a positive outlook, and a passionate bent.

An award-winning writer and photographer, Kim Yaged is passionate about…well a lot things. But, where art and activism meet is of particular interest to her and she takes dedicated action in that regard. One could classify Kim Yaged as an artivist, but that might annoy her. But, certainly she sees — and creates — art through a lens that encompasses a social justice perspective and social justice programs that incorporate art. Her work is quirky and edgy, and her artistic range is impressive.

Stephanie Schroeder asked Kim Yaged for some insight into  her art and activism as well as her relationships with both New York City and Berlin.

Continue reading

Berlin Bear nibbles on Big Apple

Conversations, Literature
Written by

Islands50! – Happy Birthday Literary Colloquium Berlin


The Literary Colloquium Berlin celebrated its 50th anniversary in New York on September 28 and 29, 2013. The panel event Shining Island, hosted by the Goethe Institut New York, brought esteemed German authors such as Marcel Beyer, Durs Grünbein, Felicitas Hoppe, and Uljana Wolf to New York. “How American is It?” asked the first panel but translator Susan Bernofksy, Beyer, and Grünbein shifted the topic towards the question how American literature and culture influenced German authors in general (a great deal) and which German authors are more celebrated abroad than at home (W.G. Sebald, Rainer Maria Rilke). While the event was off to a good start, the panel did not specifically discuss Berlin as one might expect in a panel on the “Past, Present, and Future Berlin.”

Continue reading

Category: Literature

James Harris: Trivia

Literature
Written by

comedy2He is a very funny man and if you went to our Launch Party this summer at Emerson Gallery Berlin, you have encountered James Harris live and know why. But did you know that Harris is also a very entertaining fiction writer? Here is his latest story called Trivia.

Nobody knew how he did it.  We had been watching intently for months, our eyes spotlighting him from the aisles of the cellar, as he performed his act.  Even when we elected not to watch he would appear upstairs, where we were waiting, with such a grin that we knew immediately he had pulled it off, or rather out, again.  Nobody knew how he did it.

Continue reading