Eric Booker

Born in Michigan, Eric Booker studied Art History and Museum Studies at Michigan State University. After graduating, he moved to New York to work with the curatorial departments at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and at The Studio Museum in Harlem, where he worked on such exhibitions as Maurizio Cattelan: All, Agathe Snow: All Access World, and The Bearden Project. He then began working with artists outside the museum, facilitating the grants programs at the Foundation for Contemporary Arts. He currently resides at the Calder Foundation, where he works on developing lectures, symposia, exhibitions, performances, and a host of other events that seek to engage the public while preserving the legacy of Alexander Calder.

Posts

    Jenny Brockmann at The German Consulate NYC

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    Jenny BrockmannOn May 8th, Berlin based artist Jenny Brockmann’s exhibition Air opened at the German Consulate in New York. The site-responsive projects deals with daily phenomena and cycles that are invisible yet in flux. Many of the works, even though created and installed in New York, allude to Berlin. Guest writer Eric Booker met up with Jenny who is also currently an Artist-in-Residence at ISCP in New York.

    Eric Booker: So, I know that we already talked a bit about the project in person, but maybe (for Station to Station’s sake) you could start by telling me how the exhibition at the German Consulate came to be? Was it a site that you already knew you wanted to work with? I find the liminality of such a place to be fascinating…

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    Engineer’s Office: Clandestine Operation

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    29860_102122356503550_4430925_nEngineer’s Office Gallery is probably the most clandestine art space in all of New York City: 24 inches wide, 72 inches high and 24.5 inches deep. Truly underground, the gallery is hidden in the basement beneath Rockefeller Plaza – not easy to locate but certainly worth a visit. Eric Booker spoke with Zefrey Throwell, one of the co-directors of the covert space.

    S2S: Can you begin by talking a little bit about yourself and your co-curators? How did you come up with the idea of creating a space like Engineer’s Office?

    Zefrey Throwell/Engineer’s Office: Engineer’s Office was the collaborative creation of three artists who were working at Haunch of Venison Gallery while it was located in Rockefeller Center in 2009. In order to have artwork photographed it was necessary to walk it down a long hallway in the basement of 20 Rock, beneath Christie’s Auction house. There is a small 6 foot high and 2 foot wide niche in the concrete and after passing this alcove day in and day out, we struck upon claiming it for the powers of good. The underground hallway / segue which connected Christie’s and Haunch of Venison was also additionally interesting in that it seemed to be a sort of gray area or neutral territory which was not specific to either entity and was also accessible to the public via the 47-50th street subway station. It just seemed to be begging for an intervention or re-purposing of sorts.

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